Browsing all articles tagged with windows 8 | uRexsoft Free DVD Ripper,Video Converter

Macintosh has released its brand-new Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, while the next version of Microsoft Windows, the so-called Windows 8, is still under development. Even though Windows 7 achieves great success, Microsoft should speed up to meet the challenges from Apple. Windows 8 would surely bring users an entirely new operating experience, but people may also concern if they could still rip dvd on windows 8 or they have to exchange to another windows 8 dvd ripper?

One thing for sure is that it would not be a cheap deal to upgrade from the “old” windows OS to the new Windows 8 as Microsoft always does. What if the dvd ripper is not compatible with Windows 8? It would be very frustrated to pay another dvd ripper for windows 8. As Microsoft has released the beta version now, we are glad to recommend you a Windows 8 DVD Ripper for you, which enables you to rip DVDs on Windows 8.

uRex DVD Ripper Platinum is a featured Windows 8 DVD Ripper in the market. Not only does it support Windows 8, but it also is compatible with the popular Windows 7, Vista and XP. What’s more, it fully compats 32 bit and 64 bit of Windows OS. And, it can do more things like:


Are you ready for the coming Windows 8 yet? Are your DVD ripper ready for Windows 8? If not, then you may probably be busy rushing from the DVD ripper to a Windows 8 DVD Ripper. So, get ready for Windows 8 and rip DVDs on Windows 8 to avoid scratching.

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